#GardeningForNature

Many of us have experienced a heightened love for our gardens, wildlife and green space this year. Ajay Tegala and Adam O’Hare are two such people, both passionate about encouraging nature. Wildlife Presenter & Countryside Ranger, Ajay is based in Cambridgeshire and Communicator & Filmmaker, Adam is based in Birmingham.

Together they made the mini-series of videos entitled Gardening for Nature, sharing what they have been doing to encourage wildlife into their gardens, along with contributions from other like-minded people (such as Joshua Styles); also enthusiastic about providing homes for nature alongside our own.

β€œDuring lockdown, lots of my friends and relatives were sending me pictures and stories of their gardens and their local wildlife,”

says Ajay.

“It was clear how much local green spaces and nature were benefitting so many people”.

At the same time, Adam was also making short films in his garden 100 miles away.

They decided to put together a series of three short videos [5 to 6 minutes each] about what simple steps you can take to encourage nature to come closer to our doorsteps, and how rewarding it can be.

β€œIt was quite unique that we were based in completely different parts of the country, but had similar approaches to managing our gardens with nature very much in mind”.

Adam visited a micro-farm near his Birmingham home. He also teamed up with plant enthusiast and internet sensation, Joshua Styles – via video call – to identify some of the plants growing near his home.

β€œIt was a labour of love, sharing our gardens and local wildlife over the internet.”

Now, you too can see their passion for wildlife and how they have attracted wildlife into their gardens!

Part 1 went online Monday 14th September (at 7pm) 

Part 2 goes live online Wednesday 16th September at 7pmΒ 

Part 3 goes live / online Friday 18th September at 7pm

Warmest regards,
#GardeningForNature x

Day 17 – 30 Days Wild

Went for a walk around my local Wood and Green-belt today, when I was out a storm rolled in 🌧️

Rather than head home, I decided to stay out a bit, to listen to the rain & thunder whilst outside β›ˆοΈ

Thanks for visiting! πŸ’š

Day 15 – 30 Days Wild

Today I visited an Urban Organic Micro Farm, called Rea Spring Gardens – which is a short walk away. It is own and ran by a lovely, enthusiastic couple, Charlie and Ashley, who farm with wildlife and the environment in mind 🌍

In the video below, you get to see what they grow and the animals they keep! πŸ‘¨πŸ»β€πŸŒΎ

Thanks for visiting πŸ’š

Upton Warren: Eurasian Curlew

The now classified as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List, UK Amber and Red List species under the Birds of Conservation Concern review and as a Priority Species in the UK Biodiversity Action Plan, Eurasian Curlew are still holding on at Upton Warren in the landlocked county of Worcestershire in the West Midlands region, and they can be seen throughout autumn and winter, roosting at The Flashes most evenings.

For waders they’re large and tall, approx the size of female a Pheasant – making them the largest European wading bird.  Their haunting call (‘Cur-lee’) is unmistakable – it’s one of my favourite bird calls – it can be heard from February through to July on its breeding grounds; wet grasslands, farmland, heath and moorlands.  From July onwards coastal numbers start to build up and peak in January.

Curlews feed on worms, shrimps and shellfish.  The largest concentrations of them are found at Morecambe Bay, the Solway Firth, the Wash and the Dee, plus, the Severn, Humber and Thames estuaries.  Their greatest breeding numbers are found in north Wales, the Pennines, the southern uplands and east Highlands of Scotland and the Northern Isles.

The agricultural intensification (e.g drainage and reseeding) of upland farmland and moorland – plus the afforestation of moorland – is a big factor in the decline of their breeding population.

Thanks for visiting πŸ™‚

Wildlife in March

Despite Snowmageddon, the Beast from the East and Storm Emma, some animals will still be going about their business as usual, if you can believe it!  The videos below are of what you may see if you venture out, if not, then you got to enjoy these species in detail in the comfort of your home, and maybe would have learnt a thing or two about them as well!

  (2012) 

(2011)

Thanks for visiting πŸ™‚ x

Wildlife in December

Out of the videos I have made, these three videos are definitely some of my ‘favourites’, as I love Water Rails, Whooper Swans and enjoy feeding the birds, and playingaround in the kitchen.  πŸ˜€

We were pretty much Frozen Britain recently, certainly in the West Midlands…

Packed full of fun facts (2011):

Thanks for your visit! πŸ˜‰
x

Wildlife in August

A lot of birds are quieting down now, but Yellowhammers 🐀 are continuing to sing away!  Plus this is another great month for seeing some beautiful Butterflies! πŸ¦‹ 

(The videos below were made a few years ago)

Thanks for visiting! 😊

Day 15 – 30 Days Wild

“Write a wild poem”

15/06/16

TWT 30 Days Wild_countdown_15

The weather has been inclement again, and I was off to the N.E.C later as a member of Press, to report on BBC Gardeners’ World Live.  So I opted to write a wild poem; I was happy there was a break in between showers, because I was able to get out into my partner’s garden to recite my poem

Thanks. πŸ™‚

Day 14 – 30 Days Wild

“Tweet for the wild” 

14/06/16

TWT 30 Days Wild_countdown_14

Today I tweeted a link to the video below – which I made last year – about my favourite local patch and why it matters to me:

The poem I mentioned in the video:  Ode to a Secret River

Thanks πŸ˜€